Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 12, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. an historic handshake in singapore and a joint promise to build lasting peace on the korean peninsula. the war never ended to this day, it never ended, but now we can all have hope that it will soon end and it will. it will soon end. the past does not have to define the future. the two leaders sign a four—point agreement after a0 minutes of one—to—one talks. the us president promises that "a bright future is within reach" if north korea gives up its nuclear weapons. chairman kim has told me that north korea is already destroying a major missile engine testing site. that's not in your assigned document. we agreed that after. i'm simon mccoy live at westminster as mps face crunch votes on brexit, a minister resigns in protest over the government's refusal to offer mps a meaningful vote on the final deal. justice minister phillip lee
11:01 am
says he wants to be able to look his children in the eyes, as brexit secretary david davis warns conservative backbenchers not to undermine negotiations negotiations with europe. are you confident you will win the day today? good morning. are you confident you will win the day? it'll be a good day. are you confident you will win the day? good morning. assigned declaration between the two leaders on this historic day. let's begin by listening to the us president donald trump themselves speaking just a short while ago in what turned out to be a pretty mammoth news conference, lasting over one hour in front of the world's media. let's have a little listen to what he had to say. alain prost at the meeting, the first between an american president and a leader of north korea proves that real change is indeed possible, my meeting with chairman kim was honest, direct and productive. we got to know each other well in a
11:02 am
very confined period of time and a very confined period of time and a very strong, strong circumstances. we are prepared to start a new history and we are ready to write a new chapter between our nations. nearly 70 years ago, think of 70 yea rs nearly 70 years ago, think of 70 years ago, and extremely bloody conflict ravaged the korean peninsula. countless people died in the conflict including tens of thousands of brave americans. while the armistice was agreed to, the war never ended to this day, it never rendered. and now we can all have hope that it will soon end and it will, it will soon end, the pastor does not have to define the future. yesterday's conflict does not have to be tomorrow's war. and, as history has proven over and over again, adverse threes can indeed become friends. we can honour the
11:03 am
sacrifice of our forefathers by replacing the horrors of battle with the blessings of peace. and that's what we're doing and that's what we have done. there is no limit to what north korea can achieve when it gives up its nuclear weapons and embraces, as and engagement with the rest of the world. that really wants to engage. chairman kim has before him an opportunity like no other to be remembered as the leader who ushered in a glorious new era of security and prosperity for his people. chairman kim and ijust signed a joint statement in which he reaffirmed his unwavering commitment to co m plete reaffirmed his unwavering commitment to complete the nuclear is of the korean peninsula —— denuclearisation. we agreed to implement the agreement as soon as possible and he wants to do that.
11:04 am
this is not the past. this isn't another administration that never got it started. and therefore never got it started. and therefore never got it started. and therefore never got it done. chairman kim has told me that north korea is already destroying a major missile engine testing site. that's not in your assigned document. we agreed to that after the agreement was signed. that's a big thing. the missiles they were testing, the site is going to be destroyed very soon. today is the beginning of an arduous process also our eyes are wide open but peaceis also our eyes are wide open but peace is always worth the effort, especially in this case. this should have been done years ago, this should have been resolved a long time ago. but we are resolving it now. chairman kim has the chance to seize an incredible future for his people. anyone can make war, but
11:05 am
only the most courageous can make peace. the current state of affairs cannot endure forever, the people of north and south korea are profoundly talented, industrious and gifted. these are truly gifted people. they share the same heritage, language, customs, culture and destiny but to realise their amazing destiny, to reunite their national family, the menace of nuclear weapons will now be removed. in the meantime, the sanctions will remain in effect. we dream ofa sanctions will remain in effect. we dream of a future where all koreans can live together in harmony, where families are reunited and hopes are reborn and where the light of police chases away the darkness of war. there's a bright future is within reach and this is what's happening. it's right there, it's within our reach. it's going to be there, it's
11:06 am
going to happen. people thought this could never take place for some it now taking place. it's a very great day, a great moment in the history of the world. donald trump there in the press conference that it's fair to say lasted longer than many people were expecting, over one hour. he was addressing the press. as you would expect from donald trump, the hype and the... it's safe to say the preoccupation with the world's media was uppermost in his mind and he was addressing the point at which he said he's been watching in terms of the world's media and the critics saying this is something that has happened here today, the us president is gone before have never been able to do it but that the rhetoric to one side for a moment and look at the main points of the declaration that were as follows for you. for the usa and north korea to establish new relations for peace,
11:07 am
and prosperity. that was one of the four—point plan for the build lasting unstable peace regime. and reaffirming their commitment to com plete reaffirming their commitment to complete a denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. those about the two men signed, of course, but we didn't have a framework to understand how exactly that denuclearisation is likely to take place. many here saying we are very low in terms of substance to understand how a lot of what donald trump was saying is actually going to be implement it. reaction of calls coming through quite strongly here from international leaders. south korea, of course, the president of south korea saying i pay my high, laments for the courage and determination of the two leaders, chairman kim and donald trump not to settle for the familiar outdated reality but you take a daring step towards change, adding
11:08 am
this has helped to break down the last remaining cold war legacy on earth. there were some reports we would hear a press conference coming out of the country. we are waiting to hear whether that will happen. let'sjoin robin to hear whether that will happen. let's join robin brant. to hear whether that will happen. let'sjoin robin brant. talkers through the words we just heard from the president and whether we will get a public news conference at this hour richard mark i don't think we are. those words are the best we are going to get that for now. look, this country's president, was elected a year ago stated policy of reaching out to the north, trying to establish peace with their neighbours in the north and bringing an end a formal end to the wall which technically still goes on between these two countries. the
11:09 am
president is heaping praise on donald trump and kim jong—un president is heaping praise on donald trump and kimjong—un in a statement and heaped more praise on donald trump the day before this summit talking about decisive powerful leadership but, look, what president moon has not commented on there is the fact they now need to assess what the intention and meaning was, particularly in that press c0 nfe re nce meaning was, particularly in that press conference afterwards. the press conference afterwards. the press c0 nfe re nce press conference afterwards. the press conference in which the president revealed something very significant and that is that he intends to immediately stop the war games as he described them, joint military exercises between the usa and south korea. he believes they are and south korea. he believes they a re costly and south korea. he believes they are costly and very provocative. kim jong—un hates these exercises and finds them incendiary, it's a reminder for the finds them incendiary, it's a reminderfor the north of finds them incendiary, it's a reminder for the north of the particular might of the usa, the threat of invasion they fear, a reminder to many people in the south the resilience of their alliance with the united states and for this president to say they are stopping
11:10 am
now and will not return for the time being, its a hugely significant concession i think to the north. it's a long—term aspiration for president trump to reduce numbers here, 28,000 members of the us military forces are here, a policy to reduce them around the world as well, but for some in south korea to be reminded of that, alongside the factor war games apparently are going to end will be hugely unsettling i think for some of them. yes, there was no detail when we heard donald trump talk about putting an end to the war games. i'm sure that japan is putting an end to the war games. i'm sure thatjapan is pricking up its yea rs sure thatjapan is pricking up its years when they hear that. he said president moon is a friend of his and he will be happy and his body sent word to the japanese prime minister about what happened. very
11:11 am
much a part of the conversations that have been leading up to this event for a number of months now. yes, i mean, he brought these two men together, the japanese prime minister. he met kimjong—un on two occasions in recent months, team he dispatched the white house, who went carrying the message he was willing to meet donald trump an offer he accepted within minutes. you know, the de—escalation of tension between the de—escalation of tension between the north and south, maybe even unification of some point down the line, but the economic integration of these two countries bringing their neighbours in the north out from the cold, helping develop their economies, as stated policy aims of the president and an end to the current tension is good and helps bring about that end. but i mean,
11:12 am
president trump gave some detail on the end to the war games. he said they will stop immediately. he thinks they are too costly, very provocative. there are many people here who say it was as chair strength and a resilient alliance. he thinks it's important to remind some in the north who now possess nuclear weapons, that something can reach the us mainland, let alone japan and south korea, they think those exercises are very important. i'm not sure he wants to be reminded frankly by the american president about the cost of those exercises. and the fact he thinks the south koreans should be paying more but in public, the south korean president heaping more praise on donald trump, huge praise for him. 0k, thank you very much for that. reaction from seoul, we understand a press conference will be heard on thursday of this week, the 14th ofjune,
11:13 am
coincidentally donald trump's birthday, the south korean us japanese foreign ministers will meet in seoul and held a press conference at 11am in seoul and held a press conference at ”am so that will be the first indication we get of exactly how the geopolitical strategy is now shaping up geopolitical strategy is now shaping up to be. in light of what has happened here with those foreign ministers meeting to discuss more. robert kelly, a political analyst is with me. he's here for the marathon broadcast we have been doing, still smiling. still standing in this heat, as well. we have been waiting for the detail, this declaration, the signing of it, so it gives me great pleasure to ask the question, what did you make of it? it does look like previous statement signed between north korea and korea in the past, in that sense, doesn't move is very far forward. if you watch cnn,
11:14 am
twitter, the bbc, people are talking about the detail, timeline, what can be moved? about the detail, timeline, what can be moved 7 who about the detail, timeline, what can be moved? who will do it? what do they have? maybe there's something at the beginning of the process, that's good, i guess, but we've been talking for six months and we heard was the beginning of a thing, so at some point, i've been saying this week, we need to move beyond the talking to get to the specific details and once again that did not show up, so it's not bad, but it's just not match and that's my concern. it is much to see them side by side and also to know that donald trump has invited kimjong—un to attend to the white house, that invitation has been accepted but we don't know when that will be. he said it will be an appropriate time. would you not agree that a dialogue now is forming which could pave the
11:15 am
way for a change nobody would have ever imagined beforehand? that's right and if it happens, that's a good thing but i mean, we are waiting for a signal north korea will be a different place. north korea will be more liberal, less horrific to its own people but until then, there will be problems with trust and verification. north korea is not an open place. we don't know a lot about how the government is run so there will be a lot of scepticism. in south korea there will be anxiety about it. it would help a lot if there were some action plan. i hear the president talked about giving up a fair amount of stuff in the press conference, exercises, and none of it was tied in to exercises, and none of it was tied intoa exercises, and none of it was tied in to a specific by the north so we don't give stuff away unless we get stuff and once again, in this declaration, we did not get anything specific from the north koreans. we've been talking about
11:16 am
denuclearisation since the 1990s. what is new? what is different? maybe something will come in the next few months and we will start to get to the details, but that's what we've been waiting for for six months, the detail. for now, thank you very much for that. you're watching special coverage on this historic summit live from singapore on bbc news. plenty more to come from there throughout the day. hello and welcome to westminster. we've got a busy day in prospect as the government faces a series of debates and crunch votes in the commons on brexit. but already this morning the prime minister has suffered a ministerial resignation. juniorjustice minister and remainer phillip lee has resigned. he says it's a matter of conscience and that it is "irresponsible to proceed as we are". we have a copy of phillip lee's resignation letter. in it he says, "if, in the future, i am to look my children in the eye and honestly say that i did my best for them i cannot, in all good conscience, support how our country's exit from the eu looks set to be delivered.
11:17 am
sadly, from within government i have found it virtually impossible to help bring sufficient change." i'm joined by our assistant political editor norman smith. a lot of people may say philip who? that's a fair comment. is not a big name, but the significance is this has come from a clear blue sky, no one expected this to happen, and in very trenchant terms, he is warning of the damage he believes brexit will do to ordinary people. he says parliament needs to protect uk citizens from the decision of the majority, in other words from the results of the referendum. so there is the impact of having the first ministerial resignation on brexit. this is the first one we have had. the next question is, is this a
11:18 am
one—day wonder? a one—off resignation? 0r one—day wonder? a one—off resignation? or does his resignation emboldened others to walk the plank? does it emboldened remain mps in the commons to rebel? does it trigger a broader uprising amongst remain as? we don't know the answer to that, but so far, no signs of anybody else staring. phillip lee does not have an obvious group around him. when you look at his resignation statement it a personal statement about how he can ensure that younger generations have a better legacy. you don't get the sense this is part of some bigger pitch to really derail theresa may's brexit. it's a headache she could do without because she has a big headache today, the meaningful vote later on today, the meaningful vote later on today, she's done her best to get people onside but has she succeeded enough? well, i think by and large, the government whips this morning
11:19 am
would have been patting themselves on the back thinking they've done a good job here, got everyone in a position where most of them may not rebel, they could be difficulty on the meaningful vote but by and large, we are in a good place. liz truss, esther mcvey, comings and goings this morning. 0ne truss, esther mcvey, comings and goings this morning. one would love to bea goings this morning. one would love to be a fly on the wall there this morning. came in the middle of the cabinet, the phillip lee resignation. 0ne cabinet, the phillip lee resignation. one of... boris is looking a bit sheepish. some of them had been tweeting this morning praising philip lee's courage. many of the remainders have talked a good game. but when it has come to the hour, they have shied away from actually rebelling against the government. doctor lee, whatever you think of his motives and judgment, has shown a good deal of nerve by being willing to sacrifice his
11:20 am
political career for what he believes is an important principle, namely, as he sees it, protecting people in the country from the consequences are brexit. a motion last night from dominic grieve two adapted, to make it more palatable to sarah wollaston, who will back this amendment. there was an irony that they want to take back control. yes, just to be clear, the meaningful vote was beefed up in the house of lords to essentially give mps the power if they vote no to say to mrs may, you got to go to the negotiating table and this is what we wa nt negotiating table and this is what we want you to negotiate. even some remainders were queasy about that because they thought it was giving so much power to parliament and making mrs may's job so much power to parliament and making mrs may'sjob impossible, so dominic grieve came up with a sort of milder version of this, which would oblige the government to put a motion down saying what they were
11:21 am
going to do next. i think that may still get quite a bit of traction. the important point is, it's a long way short of what the house of lords we re way short of what the house of lords were demanding which was pretty much to put parliament in the driving seatin to put parliament in the driving seat in the negotiations. norman, thank you very much indeed. more from you later on. for those of you interested in the nitty—gritty on this, we will be at westminster throughout the day but if you want to know what the meaningful vote is, except lipm, and we should get a result about 4:45pm, so that will be the time if you want to switch on your television to find out whether theresa may has got through what promises to be rather a difficult day. i want to talk to ian duncan smith whojoins me now. thank you very much forjoining us. not the best start to the day with a ministerial resignation and a very powerful term from philip lee who says resigning was a last resort, and the brexit process takes place
11:22 am
today, the vote, so isn't there an irony in your position, wanting to ta ke irony in your position, wanting to take back control and you don't want mps to have the final say on this negotiation. first of all on phillip lee, i was surprised he's resigned, i'm sorry he resigned, i didn't realise he felt strongly about it and he kept it quite quiet his to do so. it will be his responsibility to behave accordingly in the course of this debate but what i would say about the issue of the meaningful vote is quite straightforward. the amendment from the house of lords would be disastrous because what it would be disastrous because what it would do is place into the hands through statutory legislation the power in the lords which as we know is non—representative of anything at the moment, to actually come if they wanted, block the whole passage of brexit, so they could completely frustrated if not a masculine the idea we were leaving, which would deny those who voted in the referendum that they had the say we would leave, but there will be a vote in both houses on what they think of the dealer. and that is the
11:23 am
way it should be which you can't have. you can't have the help of the house of lords and commons deciding the nitty—gritty. house of lords and commons deciding the nitty-gritty. it's a take it or approach at the moment, isn't it? that's what it has to be, i'm afraid. the amendment gives mps more say. i think what the government has done is correct, amended what the lords had, to remind everybody you have a vote, but we can't have it so the whole of the house of commons and the whole of the house of lords can dictate what those terms about arrangement are because we would never settle it. imagine what the eu would say, who is actually running your negotiators the moment? 650 mps in the commons, all these members of the house of lords unelected, who are now dictating different elements, it would be chaotic, so the answer is parliament will get votes, a vote in the commons and
11:24 am
lords, and they decide whether, to finish as negotiations, do you like it or not? that is the key element. how confident are you the government can get its way? we saw ewan amber rudd calling for people to back theresa may and the boat. if the government loses today, how much trouble is this whole project in?” hope they don't lose today. i believe they won't. it causes them a problem because the key thing about this about its vote about getting the legislation through getting through simply and clearly, so all of those laws can be looked at later ina more of those laws can be looked at later in a more relaxed time and people themselves don't notice the major change. the second thing is if she goes to the council injune, it's very important the prime minister has the strongest negotiating position of all, and that will be borne out in this boat. when we pass this bill, send it back to the lords
11:25 am
again and say to them forget about it, let's have this through, once thatis it, let's have this through, once that is done, it goes to the council injunein that is done, it goes to the council injune in a strong position for them if these are defeated, then it's like you've sent out to bat without handing her the bat and pad is. that the difference. are we in geoffrey howe territory here? we are pretty much in a similar position. but i think what's clear is the vast majority of the party want theresa may to have the strongest negotiating position injune and to do that we have to give further support today and i would simply say to my colleagues, look, i understand your strong positions, phillip lee resigning, of course, but i do say to them all, come on, this is about getting the prime minister flew into the negotiations so we can see what arrangements we get for them if we don't do that today, she will go in a weakened position and the eu properly won't discuss it. tomorrow of course a vote
11:26 am
properly won't discuss it. tomorrow of course a vote on a properly won't discuss it. tomorrow of course a vote on a custom steel. everyone is saying it's a fudge. it is, isn't it? if you look at it, the two thinks about the original lords amendment were very damaging because they bounded in against the repeal of the 72 act, so what this amendment is done is recognise that people do want to see pop a discussion about a customs arrangement, many people who voted remain like myself who voted to leave, come together to say we should allow the government to get on to discuss the customs arrangements. whatever happens we have free trade arrangement in some kinds of customs arrangement which is not the same as a customs union and that's the point. the primers december notjoining and that's the point. the primers december not joining the and that's the point. the primers december notjoining the customs union because the public vote to leave the eu at a counter that if you are in the customs union. thank you are in the customs union. thank you for your time. everything is overshadowed by the resignation of phillip lee. the sentence which
11:27 am
sticks out is if energy giant to look my children in the eye and say idid my look my children in the eye and say i did my best for them, i cannot in all good conscience support how other countries exit from the eu looks set to be delivered. it is a long statement about the sentence very much which stands out. joining me now the conservative mp dominic grieve and sarah wollaston mp. you, dominic, tabled your amendment last night. what is in it? explain because we are talking about the most difficult part of the action today. one of the issues we have to consider is what we do at the end of this process, in ensuring parliament as they need for a vote and ensuring if we don't achieve a deal, parliament can both express its view and if necessary at the end of the process intervene because we would face a great national crisis. and there was a lords amendment which does that but i accept it is not com pletely does that but i accept it is not completely satisfactory and the government has tabled an amendment
11:28 am
asa government has tabled an amendment as a replacement which i also i'm afraid don't think is sufficient so my own amendment is trying to bridge that gap and it would provide a mechanism to ensure the government has to come to parliament by the end of november if there is no deal in order 0pinion opinion of what it should do and it also will have to come to parliament if any deal they present is rejected. and finally, if we have no deal by the 15th of february next year, which let's face it will only bea year, which let's face it will only be a few weeks before the end of the 29th of march, any expression of opinion of parliament to what we should do next is binding of government. the take it or leave it approach that is what you object to in the fact, aren't you just creating more difficulties in a process where you have theresa may saying, for heaven ‘s sake, we got to back each other otherwise it all falls apart? but it's not failing to back careful subdued going in to
11:29 am
negotiate our future deal with eu, this is about our process by which we tried to ensure the maximum number of safeguards as we go through it. it doesn't affect her ability to negotiate a deal at all. is it not saying you don't trust her to do it? no, it's making perfectly sensible and reasonable safeguards for what is undoubtedly a highly risky business. sarah, you are backing dominic grieve's amendment. why? to make sure we don't crash out with absolutely no deal at all and i think we just need to stop talking about structures and why that matters to people. we know if we do crash out with no deal at all, that will have serious consequences for people's jobs, will have serious consequences for people'sjobs, even will have serious consequences for people's jobs, even things will have serious consequences for people'sjobs, even things like as applied chains of medicines people rely on when they go to the pharmacy, consequences for our security, about airline travel and all sorts of things people really ca re all sorts of things people really care about and so we want to make sure that, should that be likely or
11:30 am
looks like it might be happening at the end of the deal, that parliament can come back and the government has to consult parliament about that before it just to consult parliament about that before itjust goes to consult parliament about that before it just goes down that process. we've already had a government minister resigning this morning. is there a sense that this is now getting incredibly fragile and the british public might just getting incredibly fragile and the british public mightjust turn around and say, please just get on with this at this is alljust... this is not about trying to tie the prime minister's hands, this is about what we do in case at the end of this process there is a very bad deal or no deal at all, because we think that would be disastrous.” know you were not at the meeting last night with theresa may, you had other business. dominic grieve, how do you think theresa may has played this in the last 2a hours? do you think she has managed to get enough support was no she's been very successful in the last week in bringing the party together. i'm very pleased that that has happened. she has a very difficult time to
11:31 am
play. no, ithink she has a very difficult time to play. no, i think she's done a good job. but we just need to get through these two days. and if people are just sensible, we will do so. not only that, people don't realise we're not talking about these pop —— apocalyptic visions you see in the press this morning. we are talking about the nitty—gritty detail about making sure that brexit is carried out as well as possible. you think you are being faithful to the prime minister, do you, with this? yes, entirely. absolutely, this is not about blocking brexit. anybody reading today's papers might think thatis reading today's papers might think that is the case, but it's not. it is about preventing us crashing out with no deal. white sarah wollaston and dominic grieve, thank you very much. plenty more to come later on this afternoon. now, a weather update with simon. a little bit cooler and cloudier compared to yesterday, but we have a bit of cloud across many parts of the uk. it is thinning and
11:32 am
breaking to give us bright and sunny spells from time to time. certainly our weather watcher here in hartlepool showing as well you have a bit of sunshine coming through. that process will continue through many parts of the afternoon. the risk of an ocho, very isolated, across the south of scotland —— and odd shower. you notice that these temperatures down are little bit camp out yesterday. hygiene is the potentially low 20s. impaired to about 26, 27 that we had yesterday. 0vernight tonight it is a phehlukwayo picture. 0vernight tonight it is a phehlu kwayo picture. there 0vernight tonight it is a phehlukwayo picture. there will be cloud floating around —— it is a fairly quiet picture. for wednesday, england and wales, relatively settled again with sunny spells, a little bit one compared to today. into the north and west it's going to turn wet and windy. bye—bye. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: an historic handshake in singapore,
11:33 am
and a joint promise to build lasting peace on the korean peninsula. mps face crunch votes on brexit, and a minister resigns in protest over the government's refusal to offer mps a meaningful vote on the final deal. this morning, the justice this morning, thejustice minister phillip lee resigned from the government. so he could speak his mind on brexit. the leave campaigner and donor arron banks is due to face mps' questions about claims linking him to russia. and uk employment reaches an all—time high, with the unemployment rate falling by 38,000 between february and april and april to 1.42 million. good morning. england fly to rush of the world cup in around half an
11:34 am
hour. most of the teams are going through theirfinal hour. most of the teams are going through their final preparations. the official picture of manager gareth southgate with his squad and coaching staff was released earlier today, most of the players looking relaxed before their trip. yesterday, southgate put his players for a full—sized game, down to the details of premier league referees. it was behind closed doors. southgate not giving too much away, with his starting line—ups for the first game against tunisia in a week's time. there's a long way to go before then. today they make the journey, a 45 minute journey from st petersburg, chosen by the fa due to its size and population ofjust 2400 people and are the british climate, iam told. people and are the british climate, i am told. the first day is just over 1000 miles from their base, thatis over 1000 miles from their base, that is before a game against panama, just south of their base. the final game against el zhar is 300 miles away in kalinic brad. —— against el zhar. let's hear now from
11:35 am
alan shearer. he says that southgate's side are well set for a positive tournament in russia.” think everything has been positive for them in the two friendlies they have had, they can take positives from both games. i thought they played very well in the first half in the first one and had a good result. and much the same in the second friendly. so, players have given the manager headaches, is in terms of selection, which is a great problem for gareth southgate. so, yeah, ithink problem for gareth southgate. so, yeah, i think they come into it in positive mood. well, whilst england looked very smart in their suits, they've been totally upstaged by nigeria, who once again lead the way when it comes to fashion at the world cup. this is their travel outfit, an absolute belter! looking hot! they've been selling out those kits as well, and i'm sure they will with those travel outfits, too. the new swa nsea with those travel outfits, too. the new swansea city manager graham potter says he sees relegation from the premier league is a chance for
11:36 am
the premier league is a chance for the club to start again. he joined swa nsea the club to start again. he joined swansea from the swedish club 0stersunds. he guided them to the last 32 in the last season's europa league. the 43—year—old replaces carlos ca rvalhal. league. the 43—year—old replaces carlos carvalhal. he left the club after relegation on the final day of the season. 0ne after relegation on the final day of the season. one of minor football news to bring you, and performing leeds united boss paul redford becomes the new manager of liverpool ladies. he replaces scott rogers, who left liverpool on friday. deontay wilder says he's agreed terms with anthonyjoshua's representatives of a unification boutin representatives of a unification bout in the united kingdom. while the whole the wbc heavyweight belt. that's the only title thatjoshua doesn't have. deontay wilder's manager, shelley finkel, is reported to have officially accepted terms for a fight to have officially accepted terms forafight in to have officially accepted terms for a fight in the uk. novak djokovic has had another down season so far, but he's looking to get
11:37 am
himself back into top form. the former world number one suggested that he might skip the grass court season altogether after he was knocked out of the french open last week. but now he has confirmed that he will play at queens. it's the first time in eight years that djokovic has been at queens. it means that 17 of the world 30 will compete their ahead of wimbledon. meanwhile, british number one yuan konta says she's feeling positive about the grass court season after she went out on the first round of roland garros. in the build—up to wimbledon, she turns her attention to this week's nottingham open, which starts today. i'm definitely coming into this period of the season in a slightly different position than i was last year. but i think i am equally excited, and i think i am equally excited, and i think i'm in a really good place right now in terms of my development and just my clarity on how i want to be playing and how i want to be doing my career, really. and that is all of the sport for now, simon, i'll have more in the next hour.
11:38 am
whew, thank you very much. you're watching bbc news, line simon mccoy live in westminster. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure as mps prepare for a series of crucial votes on the eu withdrawal bill over the next two days. a juniorjustice minister, phillip lee, has resigned to speak out against the government's brexit policy. he says that citizens need to be protected from decisions of the majority if they're wrong. so, what exactly is the house of commons debating and voting about, and how could it impact on the brexit process? chris morris from our reality check team is here to explain more. so, the eu withdrawal bill — the domestic legislation that will formalise uk exit from the european union — is back in the house of commons for further consideration after the government was defeated 15 times in the house of lords. now it wants to reverse 14 of those votes — on things such as specifying the time and date of exit, or on the eu's charter of fundamental rights — either outright or through new amendments which have been proposed by the government or by backbench mps. and these are the three votes that will be most closely watched — on what's called a "meaningful vote
11:39 am
in parliament", on a customs union, and on the european economic area. let's have a look at them one—by—one. .. first, the issue of a meaningful vote. this is about the withdrawal agreement the uk is negotiating with the eu. the government has suggested that a vote on the deal, later this year or early next, will be take—it—or—leave—it. either accept it, or see the uk leave the eu with no deal at all. the lords amendment would give parliament the power to stop that, and give the house of commons the right to decide what happens next if the withdrawal bill is rejected. compromise language has been suggested, but if the government loses this vote, it will show that parliament is asserting more control over the brexit process. then there are two amendments about the uk's future economic relationship with the eu. the lords amendment on a customs union is a little woolly — requiring the government to show parliament by october 31st this year that it has tried to negotiate membership of a customs union.
11:40 am
prospects of a government defeat appear to have receded, with the tabling of a compromise amendment with even vaguer language about a customs arrangement. so the real test may come with amendments to the new trade and customs bills, which are due back in the commons next month, and are much more explicit about staying in a customs union. there's also an amendment on the european economic area, which would force the government to make remaining in the eea, and therefore in the single market, a negotiating objective. it won't pass, partly because labour is telling its mps to abstain. but dozens of labour backbenchers could vote for it anyway, as will some tory rebels. that will give an indication of the strength of support for single market membership in further parliamentary battles to come. in other words, this isn't the last word by a long shot. but the eu withdrawal bill, which will probably receive royal assent next month, is a crucial part of the brexit process. and this is one of parliament's
11:41 am
opportunities to have its say. thank you very much. that's chris morris from our reality check team. i'm joined by the crossbench peer lord kersla ke. let's talk about the breaking news this morning, we have the resignation of a junior minister. what does that say about where we are at the moment, do you think? well, it's an extraordinary resignation at this point, and i think it tells us that brexit is a process is in a bad way. two years on nearly from the referendum we haven't been able to make decisions on big issues that matter. and we're ina very on big issues that matter. and we're in a very weak position negotiating with the european union. well, do we know that? because the government, david davis was saying this morning that things are progressing, we are making progress on big ticket items, and is not for the government to give a running commentary.” and is not for the government to give a running commentary. i think we're not making progress on the big issues, like the customs union, like
11:42 am
the border in ireland. and these are the border in ireland. and these are the big—ticket issues. there may be lots of little is that that are being progressed. but on the big things that are going to make the difference here, we're not making progress. and as the clock is ticking, the option of a no deal brexit is really moving out of range. notjust brexit is really moving out of range. not just because brexit is really moving out of range. notjust because it would be an economic calamity, but also because the systems and processes just won't be ready on time. you know better than most, you're a former head of the civil service. what are you hearing about the workings? the public assumes that behind—the—scenes, lots of people, lots of talks, lots of progress.” fear that progress can only be made by the civil service, and i think they are doing their very best, if they are doing their very best, if the big issues are being decided within cabinet. and far from bringing the country together, the brexit hosers hasn't brought the cabinet together will stop until they make those progress on big
11:43 am
issues, we're going to be in trouble. the conflict is between the brexiteers and their desire for a big clean break from brexiteers and their desire for a big clean breakfrom europe, and the economic reality, which is if we did that it would do enormous damage to the uk economy. in fact, you can say that the uncertainty we are facing now is already doing damage in terms of investment, jobs and our trade position. lord kerslake, thank you very much. thank you. plenty more to come from westminster throughout a very busy day. back to you, joanne. studio: thanks, simon, see you in a bit. let's just bring you a few of the other stories we're following this morning... leading brexit campaigner arron banks is being questioned by mps about allegations that russian money played a part in the referendum campaign. the co—founder of leave.eu is accused of having more meetings with kremlin officials than previously disclosed, and was offered the chance to take part in a business deal involving
11:44 am
siberian goldmines. mr banks insists it's all "nonsense". mr banks told mps that many of the stories that had appeared about the leave campaign were myths. it's quite interesting, go to dominic cummings and tim shipman's definitive work on the referendum. he actually says that base great google data and sent it to a team of astrophysicists on the west coast. i think this isjust astrophysicists on the west coast. i think this is just nonsense. there's a lot of mess around some of these things. that's one of my big issues with some of the committee taking witnesses and the evidence given and thenit witnesses and the evidence given and then it turns into almost fact. a decision by spain to take in a migrant rescue vessel stranded in the mediterranean has been hailed by the italian interior minister as a victory for his government's immigration policy. italy and malta had both refused to allow the rescue ship aquarius, which was carrying more than 600 migrants, to dock at any of their ports. it's now been decided
11:45 am
that the migrants will be transferred to other vessels before being taken to spain. mothers who decide not to breastfeed shouldn't be made to feel guilty, according to new advice from the royal college of midwives. the guidelines say that if a woman decides to bottle feed then her choice must be respected, but the official overall policy hasn't changed. let's go back to simon in westminster. thank you very much, joanne. figures released today show the number of people in work has remained at record levels, while earnings have grown slightly faster than inflation. i'm joined by alok sharma, who is the minister for employment. just looking through the figures, encouraged, is that of fair word? yes, i think it's very encouraged. we are at a record level of employment and we have more people in employment and we ever have had
11:46 am
since records began in 19 them to one. the third month in a row we are seeing regular pay—out placed with inflation, which is good news for people, more money in their pockets. the argument always is, the trouble is it is the type of work people are doing. zero—hours contract is not long—term employment. what do you say to that? well, if you look at thejobs say to that? well, if you look at the jobs that have been created since 2010, and three quarters of them have been permanent and full—time and almost 70% have been in higher levels occupations. which means people having higher salaries. when it comes to people on zero—hour contracts, which always comes up, less tha n contracts, which always comes up, less than 3% of people who are employed runs are our contracts. you what a happy man the morning, but this is a huge issue in westminster. while you at the meeting with theresa may last night? yes, i did go by. what did you make of what she had to say? this is a difficult vote for her today. we have seen in the last few days the party coming
11:47 am
together in the wake of these votes today and tomorrow. the mood in that meeting was firm warmth towards the prime minister, and what is clear is that collectively the party wants to give the prime minister best negotiating hand when she goes to the negotiations. dominic reid tabling a new amendment last night. there is an irony, isn't that, that there is opposition to the idea that there is opposition to the idea that the government at the end of this, at the end of the process, will come to the house of commons and basically just tell them what's happening, but the argument, let's ta ke happening, but the argument, let's take back control, but at the last minute they're risen here. we were very clear on the issue of the meaningful vote, there will be a meaningful vote, there will be a meaningful vote, there will be a meaningful vote in both houses of parliament, we will make sure that happens. what we've also said, it is only after that we will be able to ratify the rules for all agreement that we negotiate with the european union. —— ratify the withdrawal agreement. if the vote goes against the government within 28 days ministers will come and suggest the
11:48 am
next steps. if the vote doesn't go, as you put it, according to plan, how much trouble is theresa may in? i'm pretty optimistic about the next few days. but the key issue really is that the party collectively has come right together on this issue and people are being really very pragmatic about this from all sides. there's strong views on all sides. we are hearing them behind you right now! what has been very important for us is to come together as a party on this. we want to make sure that the prime minister has the best negotiating strategy. and yet here we are two hours after a junior minister resigns after there. villani is a valued colleague and friend. i'm very sorry he has felt he has had to leave the government in these circumstances —— phillip lee is a valued. we are going to have a meaningful vote on the deal, people should take comfort from that. alok sharma, thank you for putting up with that! there's a lot of tensions here in westminster, and
11:49 am
we will only see that rise later as that moves ahead. 4pm is the first meaningful vote vote. from a rather noisy westminster, let's go back to you, joanne. studio: more from simon a bit later. thank you very much, joanne. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour. but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: history is made in singapore with a handshake that signifies a joint promise to build lasting peace on the korean peninsula and a new relationship between the us and north korea. mps face crucial votes on the eu withdrawal bill, as thejustice minister philip lee resigns to speak out against the government's brexit policy. arron banks, who helped fund the leave.eu brexit campaign, is appearing before mps to answer questions about his contacts with russia during the referendum campaign. i'm ben thompson.
11:50 am
in the business news... unemployment fell by 38,000 to 1.42 million in the the three months to april, but wage growth fell. the slowdown is likely to dampen expectations of an interest rise in august. more on this in a moment. poundworld's founder is considering buying back some of the discount retailer's stores, after it fell into administration yesterday. christopher edwards, who sold the business in 2015 for £150 million to tpg capital, says the chain could be saved with fresh management. new look is continuing to cut prices as it tries to turn around its business. it wants 80% of its clothes to sell for less than £20. the price cuts come amid falling sales, which were down nearly 12% in the year to march. website sales were down 19%. as we've been hearing, unemployment in the three months to april fell by 38,000 to 1.42 million, according to official figures out today
11:51 am
by the office for national statistics. but it's not all good news. wage growth unexpectedly slipped over the same period, from 2.9% to 2.8%. that means wages were rising less quickly. wage growth is one of the key figures the bank of england monitors to assess the health of the uk economy. economists believe this slight decline in wage growth means an interest rate rise in august is now less likely. so, lots of data to mull over there. joining us now is yael selfin, chief economist at kpmg in the uk. nice to see you, welcome to the programme this morning. let'sjust talk about that headline figure, a fall in unemployment, but nonetheless, it's always the type of jobs that are created that the issue, isn't it? well, we are seeing
11:52 am
a relatively strong labour market and increasing vacancies across the board, really. the issue is not so much with the labour market but in the three months to april we've seen output that was relatively sluggish compared to last year. and what it means is in terms of productivity, productivity is not really that great. and therefore it gives less room for businesses to increase wages. that's just room for businesses to increase wages. that'sjust be really clear, what we are seeing is more people working, injobs, but as a country we are not producing as much as we should be given that level of employment. as we should be. we have a very strong labour market, as this is relatively confident and it gives confidence for households to spend. but the output as a result of that is not as high as we would want it to be. why not? we know this is called a product evictee puzzle, but explain here if you come for us? --
11:53 am
a productivity puzzle. there is a lot of potential reasons as to why productivity is relatively disappointing in the uk. some of it is due to the mix of sectoral output that we have, that is slightly different to what we had before. some of it is a result of out of the uncertainty around brexit. and some of it is potentially due to more long by structural changes in the economy, where we would potentially see a pick—up later on, where we would potentially, hopefully see no investment in technology —— new investment in technology —— new investment in technology sharing in the actual numbers. some of it could potentially be cheap so might do to measurement issues. maybe it has bones that rise in interest rates that many are forecasting to happen in august —— postpones that rise. so, we have seen earnings for a little bit, and wrote for a little
11:54 am
bit, which means that even though the labour market is relatively tight —— and growth falling. we have seen wages going up by less, so the domestic price pressure may be lower than what the bank of england feared earlier on, that would give its room to wait, given that output overall is lower, to wait and see if inflationary pressures are picking up inflationary pressures are picking up later on. in any case, august is a funny month to raise rates given that a lot of people are holiday. i would say it's more likely for the bank of england to wait until november before rix raises rates. yes, will speak again about this. —— before it raises rates. ade, thank you. we've been looking at what investors make of all of those events in singapore, whether they were nervous
11:55 am
i had of that signing and what it means since. well, frankly, they don't really care! you can see it has changed over the course of the day. frankly, as far as investors are concerned, there are other things to be worried about, particularly the trade war that has been sparked off by the tariffs that president trump is put on other nations in the world. business as usual, and they are worrying about other things. i'll see you soon. thanks, ben, see you soon. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. we will have all of the very latest on that historic summit, kim jong—un saying that the two leaders have had a historic meeting and decided to leave the past point, the world will see a major change. they have pledged to work together towards com plete pledged to work together towards complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. all the latest coming up in a few moments, live from singapore. right now, let's catch up with the weather with simon
11:56 am
king. thank you. we have had a cloudy start of the day, it has been cooler compared to yesterday. that cloud is thinning and breaking up from time to time. we've got a bit of sunshine coming through in the isle of wight on what was a mostly cloudy scene. but look at this, much more in the way of sunshine, breaking up that cloud in devon at the moment. that's the sort of thing we are looking at the many parts of the uk, cloud floating around, also some bright and sunny weather. there isa some bright and sunny weather. there is a risk of 12 showers developing in southern scotland, wales and the south west of england. though showers are very south west of england. though showers are very isolated. for most, it's dry this afternoon. those temperatures down on yesterday. 15-17d in temperatures down on yesterday. 15—17d in the east after about 21 celsius in the south. through this evening and tonight, not a great deal going on with the weather, really. lengthy clear spells, some cloud here and there. temperature is no lower than about 6—12 or 13 degrees. into wednesday, we've got
11:57 am
this ridge of high pressure which is holding an across england and wales. 0ut towards the west, more cloud, rain, all associated with these areas of low pressure which will gradually moving, bringing a change to the weather across western scotla nd to the weather across western scotland and northern ireland, a strengthening wind into the afternoon. england and wales, another dry day for many with sunny spells coming through, temperatures up spells coming through, temperatures up into the 20s. scotland and northern ireland, 17—19d. going into thursday we have a deep area of low pressure moving its wake, look at the isobars, quite close together. and usual to cad area of low pressure in mid—june. that is bringing —— unusual to cad area of low pressure. that is bringing disruptive winds. just of 70 mph, particularly in central scotland. rush—hour on thursday morning, that could lead to some problems. problems with ferries, roads and
11:58 am
bridges. just watch out for that. dales or severe gales during thursday. those winds will fairly swiftly is away. but always quite strong winds across portland. 0utbreaks strong winds across portland. outbreaks of rain. rain moving down towards the south—east. i thursday afternoon, dry weather around and plenty of sunshine and light winds, with those temperatures about 16 to 22 celsius. unsettled weather coming up, stay tuned to the forecast. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. an historic handshake in singapore and a joint promise to build lasting peace on the korean peninsula. the war never ended to this day, it never ended, but now we can all have hope that it will soon end and it will. it will soon end. the past does not have to define the future. the two leaders sign a four—point agreement after one—to—one talks. president trump promises that "a bright future is within reach"
11:59 am
if north korea gives up nuclear weapons. chairman kim has told me that north korea is already destroying a major missile engine testing site. that's not in your assigned document. we agreed to that after. i'm simon mccoy live at westminster. as mps face crunch votes on brexit, a minister resigns in protest. justice minister phillip lee says he wants to be able to look his children in the eyes. but conservative backbenchers are warned not to undermine negotiations with brussels. we will have the latest from westminster on what could be a difficult day for the prime minister. good afternoon.
12:00 pm
the world is about to see ‘a major change'. those were the words of kim jong—un, after his historic meeting with donald trump a few hours ago. the us president spoke of a "special bond" and described the talks as "honest, direct and productive". my colleague babita sharma is in singapore. you are watching bbc news of special coverage of the historic summit that took place here between the north korean leader kim jong—un and donald trump, the us president. donald trump, the us president. donald trump in the last few minutes boarding air force one to depart from singapore heading back to america, of course. hard to think he arrived on sunday evening and what we saw here a few hours ago, the unprecedented scenes of the handshake, the symbolism between the two men as they shook hands at 9am local time on engaging in an
12:01 pm
informal discussion, just themselves and their interpreters before the official summit got under way with their various and respective delegations in time. it was a working lunch at about 1130 local time, and the talks ended after 3.5 hours. and then we saw the moments that they both signed in their names into the box of a four—point declaration which we will mull over in detailfor you in a moment or so. and then donald trump had a rather mammoth press conference going on for longer than we anticipated over an hour addressing questions to the world's media about what he called a significant change in terms of progress between the two. let's catch up with all the latest development with my correspondence. making history with a handshake.
12:02 pm
many thought this moment would never come but when it finally did, it was measured and choreographed. 0nce inside, though, the two men appeared more relaxed, even smiling for the camera ‘s. more relaxed, even smiling for the camera 's. it will be tremendously successful. but from kim jong-un, slightly more reserved toner. he said it hasn't been easy to get here and old prejudices have been obstacles and old prejudices have been o bsta cles in and old prejudices have been obstacles in his way but he has ove rco m e obstacles in his way but he has overcome all of that and that's why he is here today. later at lunch, chance to size each other up and fought kim jong—un to get a glimpse of its adverse free across the table. let's get a good picture so we look nice and handsome. then a short stroll in the gardens before an unexpected announcement. a lot of progress. better than anybody
12:03 pm
could've expected. top—of—the—line, really good. we are coming right now for a signing. some confusion initially as to what they were going to sign but when they put pen to paper donald trump called it a comprehensive document. it would see the process of denuclearisation begin very, very quickly. here's a worthy negotiator. negotiating on behalf of his people are very worthy smart decision. and then another handshake to seal the deal but who was there is a better deal for? handshake to seal the deal but who was there is a better dealfor? no details, no mention of whether there is denuclearisation process will be verifiable or irreversible. 0ne is denuclearisation process will be verifiable or irreversible. one may wonder what has actually been achieved at the summit. there's no timetable for denuclearisation although president trump said international observers will go into north at some point. president trump
12:04 pm
clarified that sanctions would remain in place on the north. but in another surprise, revealed during a media briefing the us would stop war games with south korea and us troops could one day be removed from the peninsular. i want to get our soldiers back home. we have 32,000 soldiers back home. we have 32,000 soldiers in south korea. and i'd like to be able to bring them back home but that's not part of the equation right now. at some point i hope it will be but not right now. we will be stopping the war games which will save us a tremendous amount of money. but while that may be worrying for south korea, a key ally of the united states, for now, ally of the united states, for now, a commitment to move forward. this isjust the beginning and there may be many difficulties to be had but we will never go back to the past again. and never give up on this journey. fought kim jong-un, senior
12:05 pm
leaving the summit, this has been a far more positive outcome for north korea than many had originally expected. this is what he's been working towards for so long, gaining international legitimacy whilst making very few concessions. that's how the events unfolded here in singapore and in the last half an hour confirmation that donald trump has left a singapore, boarding air force one, taking offjust after 6:25pm local time, and making his way to america, of course. we've had little in way of pictures and movement from kim jong—un's delegation team after they left the resort island which was playing host to the historic talks a little earlier. perhaps you can shed some light about what is happening at the hotel with kim jong—un and his team.
12:06 pm
are they set to leave, as well? well, not just yet. are they set to leave, as well? well, notjust yet. kimjong—un are they set to leave, as well? well, notjust yet. kim jong—un and his entourage came back around 2pm local time, about five hours ago, and since then we have not had much movement. you can see a lot of media camping outside waiting for the next move, which will be for him to head back to the airport before flying home to north korea, but it seems like kim jong—un has home to north korea, but it seems like kimjong—un has decided to make the most of the luxury hotel but he has been put up in, the saint regis hotel. the room here costs thousands of dollars and the singapore government has told the bbc that they have decided to pay the bill, so he's enjoying the room but you do have to wonder if he was watching a conference by president trump and
12:07 pm
whether he noticed that president trump used their language basically, using the word like provocation to describe what he calls the war games and military exercises between south korea and the united states which kim jong—un has always, always hated. yes, indeed. it will be fascinating to find out what he made of it, of course, but we are getting a lot of reaction to what has happened, notably from south korea and the leader there. in terms of a possible press conference taking place from seoul, we understand it's not happening imminently. no, it doesn't seem like it. as many observers have been saying, it might be that president trump, some of the state m e nts be that president trump, some of the statements he made during that mammoth press conference, may have
12:08 pm
caused president moon a little bit off—guard, the cancellation of the military exercises in which the us military exercises in which the us military in south korea ended, and said they had no knowledge of, there we re said they had no knowledge of, there were other things president trump talked about such as south korea and japan probably paying for the cost of denuclearisation of north korea should it happen in the nearfuture. we are expecting the foreign ministers of south korea, japan and the united states to meet in seoul later this week so we will find out whether those key allies of the region were notified and consulted before president trump made those comments. but there were a lot of interesting remarks from that press conference. thank you very much for now. back to you as soon as they get any indication as to what is
12:09 pm
happening with kim jong any indication as to what is happening with kimjong un and his tea m happening with kimjong un and his team at the saint regis hotel. that meeting, the foreign ministers of south korea, the usa, japan, meeting on thursday the 11th. a statement released from the south korean prime minister saying the agreement will be recorded historic event and he went on to say it's a great victory achieved by both the usa and a huge step forward for long lasting peace and he said we are to leave the dark days of war and conflict behind us. also getting a piece of information from the reuters news agency carrying a line from a spokesperson for the chinese foreign ministry saying china is already talking about the possibility of easing the international sanctions against north korea, adding the sanctions can be adjusted in accordance with north korea's behaviour. he went on
12:10 pm
to say the un security council tobacco peace efforts between president trump and kim jong—un. a lot of reaction coming through as you would expect as the historic summit ends here in singapore today. robert kelly is with me. a political a nalyst. robert kelly is with me. a political analyst. thank you for being with us. we are doing at marathon broadcast from 6am this morning to where we are today. you were just listening to me talking about those press statements. i want to ask about what we've just heard from reuters carrying the reaction from china about the easing of sanctions. yes, this means maximum pressure is going to be harderfor the campaign against north korea to bludgeon to come to the table. without chinese cooperation on that, that's the big missing link because china is 92% of trade for north korea. it would put
12:11 pm
a cord around north korea and maximum pressure. the president and mike pompeo talked about sanctions but if china does not work with that, it won't work and so i imagine the usa will call the chinese soon and say, please don't. this is a concern. donald trump spoken on the phone to president moon saying he's only been sent word about what has happened and he will be very happy and the sounds to be happy from the state and we just heard. he said it's a historic moment and applauding the fact they should be supported in their efforts as they move forward. i think his government would like to run north korea on its own and any donald trump to have a big sit down with them to get the north americans to sign off on it. they are important for security but i think president moon once donald trump to sign off on this thing and then step out of the way. he's been thinking that this for a lot longer than donald trump and they are close
12:12 pm
at north korea. notably absent, the irreversible and very viable mentions of giving up nuclear weapons in north korea and the fine details of this four—point treaty. that is what you were looking for when you are talking about substance and detail but it was not there but nevertheless, a commitment was given by word between the two leaders to do this. they talk about complete denuclearisation. that was part of the package. if the north koreans do it, it would be great. they have a lot of missiles and nuclear weapons now. they have engineers, facilities. it would be an enormous undertaking infrastructure re—. it could be reversible and it will be something we have to talk about. i think about is where it will come apart. it means we have to penetrate north korea, send in inspectors and go into places and the north koreans
12:13 pm
will fight against that in the same way as saddam hussein fought against inspectors. we don't know exactly how it's going to happen but for now, stay with us please. lou are continuing with us as we pore over the detail of what has happened here. an unprecedented day, comprehensive coverage continuing. sta plers comprehensive coverage continuing. staplers live in singapore. —— stay with us live in singapore. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. history is made in singapore with a handshake that signifies a joint promise to build lasting peace on the korean peninsula and a new relationship between the us and north korea. mps face crucial votes on the eu withdrawal bill, as thejustice minister philip lee resigns to speak out against the government's brexit policy. arron banks, who helped fund the leave.eu brexit campaign, tells mps there is "no evidence" he was involved in a conspiracy with russian officials.
12:14 pm
time for a sport update with holly. england are on their way to rush for the world cup. they are flying out to saint petersburg was lunchtime and they have left us with this official squad picture, most of the players looking pretty relaxed before their trip. looking very smart as well and yesterday gareth southgate put his players through their paces in a match actually played behind closed doors. sub is not giving too much away about his starting line—up for that first game against tunisia in one week. let's hear from the against tunisia in one week. let's hearfrom the former against tunisia in one week. let's hear from the former england captain alan shearer who says gareth southgate's side are well set for a positive tournament in russia.” think everything has been very positive for them. in the two
12:15 pm
friendlies they have had. they can ta ke friendlies they have had. they can take positives from both games i thought they played very well in the first half in the first one and a good result. much the same in the second friendly. so players have given the manager headaches. in terms of selection. that's a great problem for gareth southgate. so, yeah, ithink problem for gareth southgate. so, yeah, i think they come into it in positive mood. one other line of football news to bring you, the former leeds united boss neil redfearn is a new manager of liverpool ladies. hejoins from doncaster belles and replaces scott rogers, who left liverpool on friday. in the past hour, david haye has announced his retirement from boxing. it follows his defeat to tony bellew last month for the second time in succession and the former cruiserweight champion said it is the right time to end his career. i am no longer a
12:16 pm
professional boxer, something i've been since the age of ten. it's a strange thought. but it's a thought iam very strange thought. but it's a thought i am very comfortable with as i reviewed my life and my physicality and it's not what it needs to be to compete at world level as a heavyweight. staying with boxing, wilder has agreed terms with and 0ver over a unification bout in the uk. he held the belt, the only title joshua does not have. british and onejohanna joshua does not have. british and one johanna konta says joshua does not have. british and onejohanna konta says she's feeling positive about the grass court season after going out in the first round of the french open. she turns her attentions to this week 's nottingham open where she plays in the first round this afternoon. that's all your sport for now. more for you in the next hour. goodbye
12:17 pm
for you in the next hour. goodbye for now. thanks a lot. see you later, holly. a big day at westminster today, as mps vote on the eu withdrawal bill, which will shape the way the uk leaves the european union. simon mccoy is at westminster. macros big thank you very much. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure as mps prepare for a series of crucial votes on the eu withdrawal bill over the next two days. a juniorjustice minister, phillip lee, has resigned to speak out against the government's brexit policy. he says that citizens need to be protected from decisions of the majority if they're wrong. we have a copy of phillip lee's resignation letter. in it he says... 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is here. the worst timing for the prime
12:18 pm
minister. it really is and it came, clear blue sky and no one expected this. government whips were privately congratulating themselves toa privately congratulating themselves to a disused looming revolt and suddenly one of their ministers goes and after theresa may had appealed to tory mps, don't cause trouble because it will make myjob harder in brussels, so at that very simple shock, impact level, it is bad news for theresa may but there's a couple of other reasons why it's bad news. 0ne of other reasons why it's bad news. one is whether doctor lee's decision encourages other ministers to do the same and whether it starts a series of resignations. the signs are so far it's not going to, no sign of anyone else wobbling. most of the people i've spoken to don't think it's on the cards. there was i howl of despair by doctor lee, but what it may well do, it stiffen the resolve of tory remain rebels in the commons this afternoon, looking at
12:19 pm
doctor phillip lee who cites the meaningful vote, the need for parliament to have a meaningful vote was his reason for going, whether it stiffe ns was his reason for going, whether it stiffens their resolve to rebel on that. all eyes on tory rebels but what about the labour position on this? jeremy corbyn is facing a zone revolt over this issue of the single market. there's been simmering rows in labour ranks for months over the single market, pro—eu labourfigures are adamant the best way to protect jobs and industry whichjeremy corbyn said he wants from brexit is to stay in the single market. jeremy corbyn has basically vetoed the idea in part because he thinks it would be defying the will of leave voters but also because he believes it would scupper his ambitions to nationalise various industries and to pour money into the steel industry. there will be a revolt by a sizeable number of labour mps against his position on the single
12:20 pm
market. interesting to see how large it could go to 60, maybe more. how much trouble if theresa may in potentially at 4pm? less than people might think is the honest truth. if she defeated on the meaningful vote it'll be on amendments put down by dominic grieve. that amendment is quite a few notches down from what the house of lords were demanding, who was saying if mrs may comes back from brussels, parliament votes down the deal, then mps can decide what happens next. dominic grieve is saying the parliament voted down, let's give the government 28 days to work out what they are going to do, and come back with a motion to parliament and then we can take a look at it. so it is a beefed up vote of no where near what the house of lords was suggesting. just talk through what we can expect at around 4:45pm this afternoon when the votes come back. mass confusion
12:21 pm
potentially. all these votes happen one after another. during the maastricht years, the government's chief whip, a former paratrooper, voted in the wrong lobby because there were so many going on, so we could have confusion again. but it all goes according to plan for the government, a series of votes, the government, a series of votes, the government will win all of them because they've made a whole load of concessions. the key one to look out for is the one from douglas hogg which is the meaningful vote, which dominic grieve has amended. and the key thing is to see whether the government is defeated their and will get that around 3:15. norman, we will talk to you later. thank you very much. 4:30pm on words, we'll keep an eye on what happens. the vote at about 4pm and it normally ta kes vote at about 4pm and it normally takes about 45 minutes. i'm joined by labour's shadow northern ireland secretary tony lloyd.
12:22 pm
thank you forjoining me. there was confusion about labour's position on many of these issues still.” confusion about labour's position on many of these issues still. i think there is real confusion about where there is real confusion about where the government is going because the public overwhelmingly say they think the government is making a bad job of the negotiations, so the conversations taking place across labour is the intelligent conversation. how do we get brexit which guarantees access to our major trading partners and jobs, and makes sure towns like mine in rochdale and northern ireland have proper economic success and no hard borders. we've not got there yet in this government. labour is com pletely this government. labour is completely spread about the single market. jeremy corbyn says he can't settle for a no deal for brexit. where do you stand on this? that's
12:23 pm
absolutely right, it wouldn't for example guarantee no borders across the island of ireland, and that's something everybody ought to say they will not countenance. and eh style agreement which does not cover agricultural produce is not the thing for the cross—border traffic which we know takes place, not on a daily basis, but almost minute by minute between north ireland and south ireland. we can't allow for that. that's why we won't go with it. labour was clear on the fact we wa nt a ccess it. labour was clear on the fact we want access to the customs union, we wa nt to want access to the customs union, we want to see access to the single market on the equivalent terms to what we've got now because that's about the economic successes of this country and jobs going into the future. ten months to go. the main issueit future. ten months to go. the main issue it appears is going to be that border. today we have got the big issue, the meaningful vote, which
12:24 pm
matters and the government simply can't come back and threaten the people of this country with either falling out in a disastrous way from you... but don't you weaken the negotiating position if you have that proviso at the last minute? that's an argument they will put forward today but the reality in the end, this country can't afford a bad deal at the end of this and at the moment very few people have got confidence theresa may is negotiating that. of course, the no ha rd negotiating that. of course, the no hard border is an absolute, the government is committed to that, the eu is committed to that and most certainly the labour party is committed to that and that is going to be the issue amongst others that this government has not yet solved. i'm guessing many of your constituents when you talk to them and they ask how it's going, the overriding wish is just get on with it. is their frustration? a huge frustration but my constituents have different views, we know that, but
12:25 pm
most people are saying to me, we wa nt most people are saying to me, we want some certainty, we want to know our industries will still be able to trade, our services will be able to trade. that matters because, in the end, what those people in senior positions are saying to me is they can't see what the future looks like. two years on and there is a muddle so the government is making not just a botched job muddle so the government is making notjust a botched job but it's disastrous. we need clarity. the kind of things labour is putting down as a basis for negotiation are the ones to protect the economy for the ones to protect the economy for the future and guarantee no hard border in ireland. you are a member of the shadow cabinet. is the mood you could be going into government in the next year so if this does not go to plan? politicians make predictions about when the next general election comes around, is
12:26 pm
a lwa ys general election comes around, is always wrong. i would say that if the government continues on this incompetent path, the best thing for this country would be to resolve things i've general election. let's have the public but properly in charge of the situation and choose who can negotiate the kind of brexit to safeguard the interests of people in this country. tony, thank you very much forjoining us. focus very much on the government position today. theresa may meeting members of 1920 backbench committee last night persuade them to get behind her. but there is a focus on what happening in the labour party. i'm joined by the labour mp alison mcgovern. nice to see you. you want the single market. that's right. the reason that it's a deal which will be negotiable. we've seen the government absolutely divided and all over the shop because... your party is too, isn't it? no, because
12:27 pm
the government is saying we could have all that money back, and also have all that money back, and also have no freedom of movement and have all of these trade deals which haven't materialised so they have an unrealistic position whereas labour has taken a sensible and pragmatic approach. we have said we want to be pa rt approach. we have said we want to be part of the customs union and keir starmer said he wants a positive single market deal. the discussion at the moment is about an amendment which would basically said that eea agreement as essentially a backstop position, saying, you know, we can't have no deal. we can't have a jacob rees mogg type represent... jeremy corbyn says you can't settle for a norway style. the thing we're trying to prevent it injacob rees mogg style no deal about the economy, car industry on its knees. the issue about norway is it's a funny one because i understand that when
12:28 pm
people express their concerns about it it's because britain has a much bigger economy, and if we were to be pa rt bigger economy, and if we were to be part of that eea family, it would be fundamentally different for us and i com pletely fundamentally different for us and i completely accept that, but what those of us who are talking about it wa nt to those of us who are talking about it want to get as to if a deal which would actually be negotiable at europe, a model for running our economy. . . europe, a model for running our economy... the government says that been doing for the last two years. you are just refighting the original referendum debate. whatever the government has been trying to do, it hasn't worked and i would argue that because they have an imaginary approach to issues like the northern irish borderfor approach to issues like the northern irish border for example. whereas what our colleagues in northern ireland tell is really the customs union and bleed regulatory alignment and that's what the single market gives you, so you can have that free and open border affairs on the island of ireland. that's what we need and the labour party has taken
12:29 pm
a pragmatic and sensible approach andi a pragmatic and sensible approach and i would argue we should go a little bit further, but that's because our approach is completely realistic and it takes into account how our economy actually works rather than what it was once like in the 1870s. it takes into account modern manufacturing, how other services actually work and while people may say these arguments were happening in the referendum, aaron economy hasn't fundamentally changed since then so we need a deal which puts jobs since then so we need a deal which putsjobs and since then so we need a deal which puts jobs and growth at the heart of what we're trying to achieve, not as an afterthought. thank you very much for the plenty more to come from westminster. 4pm, the vote takes place and the result around for 40 5pm. back to you, joanna. thanks, simon. let's bring you up—to—date with what arron banks, the founder of the leave.eu, has been saying to mps about links with the russians. he said he gave russian embassy officials telephone numbers of president trump's in a
12:30 pm
circle, he says it is the only information he did actually give to them, and that was having had permission from trump's transition tea m permission from trump's transition team to pass on telephone numbers. his colleague andy wigmore has said he never accepted money from the russian government. they are being questioned by mps about possible ties to russia, after a newspaper reported that there were allegations that the links went deeper and further than had ruthlessly been disclosed. arron banks has said this morning —— than had previously been disclosed. he said when being questioned by mps that prior to the referendum in 2016 contact with russians was not regarded as an issue. he said, we have a full—scale russian witchhunt going on, before that occurred, it was no issue. it is 12:32pm. we are going to get the very latest from the courts. and alleged national action member has
12:31 pm
pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism by plotting to murder the mp rosie cooper with a knife. 23—year—old jack renshaw allegedly planned to murder the politician on behalf of the band far right group national action. the defendant also pleaded guilty to making a threat to kill a woman called victoria henderson. dominic casciani is outside the court. manic, bring us up outside the court. manic, bring us up to date with the latest details on this? surprising turn of events this morning, just literally before the trial of jack renshaw was supposed to start, he is 23 from skelmersdale, he and five other defendants are accused of being members of national action, a neo—nazi group banned in 2016. renshaw was accused of plotting an act of terrorism by running to murder rosie cooper, a lancashire
12:32 pm
mp. minutes before the trial was due to start, his counsel asked for the charges to be put to renshaw again, and he admitted both of those specific charges, and in particular what he was going to do, it now emerges, was to buy what to all intents and purposes looks like a gladiator machete, as it is described by the prosecution, and that was going to be part of his plan to murder the mp. thejury heard this morning that another man in the dock, christopher lythgoe, was allegedly asked, as the de facto leader of the band group, to give his blessing to renshaw‘s plan. mr lythgoe is from warrington and denied that allegation, along with the allegation of membership of national action. for a left court, the prosecution were explaining to the prosecution were explaining to thejury the prosecution were explaining to the jury what national action stood for, that it was a racist, homophobic and anti—semitic group that from 2030 onwards used a variety of tax extra try and recruit
12:33 pm
young people to radicalise them —— a variety of tactics. it hoped to bring about a race war on the streets of written, in particular through social media tactics, provocative street demonstrations and local intimidation of minority communities. all six men pleaded not guilty to membership of the group, but just this guilty to membership of the group, butjust this morning guilty to membership of the group, but just this morning jack guilty to membership of the group, butjust this morning jack renshaw has admitted those two key charges. the trial is expected to last a few weeks and it is going to come down to key evidence about the alleged activities of these men following the banning order in september 2016, and whether or not their communications and activity in meetings are mounted to basically illegal meetings of a banned terrorist group. quite a significant morning, joanna. thank you, dominic. let's catch up with the weather, matt taylor has the details. good afternoon. it looks cloudier and fresh out that across parts of the
12:34 pm
uk this afternoon, but pleasant enoughin uk this afternoon, but pleasant enough in the sunshine and for many it is dry yet again. isolated showers could pop up this afternoon in southern and western parts of the uk, at most places rain dry. temperatures up to 27 degrees, 22 and maybe 23 as top today, most in the high teens and low 20s. enter tonight, a lot of the club dissipates. some cloud here and there, but slightly fresher air, it will start to tomorrow morning, temperatures away from the towns and cities in single figures. a lovely start to the day, dry and sunny for the vast majority. cloud in england and wales through the afternoon producing the odd shower. after a fine morning in scotland and northern ireland, the return of rain in the afternoon. in western scotland. thursday night, very wet and windy, could cause travel disruption for the thursday morning rush—hour. we will keep you updated. this is bbc newsroom live.
12:35 pm
our latest headlines: a historic handshake in singapor, and a joint promise by president trump and kim jong—un to build lasting peace on the korean peninsula after conflict of 70 years ago ended in an uneasy stalemate. the war never ended — to this day, never ended. but now we can all have hope that it will soon end. and it will soon end. the past does not have to define the future. justice minister philip lee resigns from the government so he can speak his mind over brexit, as mps renew their debate on leaving the eu, with a series of close votes expected. the businessman arron banks, who donated millions of pounds to the campaign to leave the eu, has told a committee of mps there is no evidence he was involved in a conspiracy with russian officials.
12:36 pm
and uk employment reaches an all—time high, with the unemployment rate falling by 38,000 between february and april to 1.42 million. an alleged member of the banned neo—nazi group national action, has admitted plotting to murder the west lancashire mp rosie cooper. 23—year—old jack renshaw also admitted threatening to kill a police officer. let's return now to westminster, where mps will be debating some crucial amendments to the eu withdrawal bill, which will shape the way the uk leaves the european union. simon mccoy is there. thanks, joanne. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure, as mps prepare for a series of crucial votes on the eu withdrawal bill over the next two days. a juniorjustice minister, phillip lee, has resigned to speak out against the government's brexit policy. he says that citizens need to be protected from decisions of the majority if they're wrong. so, what exactly is the house
12:37 pm
of commons debating and voting about, and how could it impact on the brexit process? chris morris from our reality check team explains more. so, the eu withdrawal bill — the domestic legislation that will formalise uk exit from the european union — is back in the house of commons for further consideration after the government was defeated 15 times in the house of lords. now it wants to reverse 14 of those votes — on things such as specifying the time and date of exit, or on the eu's charter of fundamental rights — either outright or through new amendments which have been proposed by the government or by backbench mps. and these are the three votes that will be most closely watched — on what's called a "meaningful vote in parliament", on a customs union, and on the european economic area. let's have a look at them one—by—one. ..
12:38 pm
first, the issue of a meaningful vote. this is about the withdrawal agreement the uk is negotiating with the eu. the government has suggested that a vote on the deal, later this year or early next, will be take—it—or—leave—it. either accept it, or see the uk leave the eu with no deal at all. the lords amendment would give parliament the power to stop that, and give the house of commons the right to decide what happens next if the withdrawal bill is rejected. compromise language has been suggested, but if the government loses this vote, it will show that parliament is asserting more control over the brexit process. then there are two amendments about the uk's future economic relationship with the eu. the lords amendment on a customs union is a little woolly — requiring the government to show parliament by october 31st this year that it has tried to negotiate membership of a customs union. prospects of a government defeat appear to have receded, with the tabling of a compromise amendment with even vaguer language about a customs arrangement. so the real test may come with amendments to the new trade and customs bills, which are due back in the commons next month, and are much more explicit about staying
12:39 pm
in a customs union. there's also an amendment on the european economic area, which would force the government to make remaining in the eea, and therefore in the single market, a negotiating objective. it won't pass, partly because labour is telling its mps to abstain. but dozens of labour backbenchers could vote for it anyway, as will some tory rebels. that will give an indication of the strength of support for single market membership in further parliamentary battles to come. in other words, this isn't the last word by a long shot. but the eu withdrawal bill, which will probably receive royal assent next month, is a crucial part of the brexit process. and this is one of parliament's opportunities to have its say. chris morris from our reality check team. the conservative former attorney general dominic grieve has tabled an amendment calling for the government to be forced to set out the next steps if parliament rejects the deal. it's being supported by conservative
12:40 pm
mp dr sarah wollaston. mr grieve told me why he thought it was important to introduce the amendment. 0ne one of the issues that we're having to consider is what we do at the end of this process, firstly in ensuring that parliament has a meaningful vote, and secondly in ensuring that if we don't achieve a deal, parliament can both expressed its view, and, if necessary at the end of the process, can intervene, because we will be facing a great national crisis. and there is a lords amendment that does that, but i accept that it's not completely satisfactory, and the government has tabled an amendment in lieu, as a replacement, which i also don't think is sufficient. so my own amendment is trying to bridge that gap, and it will provide a mechanism to ensure that the government will have to come to parliament by the end of november if there is no deal in order to get parliament's opinion on what it should do. and it also will have to come to parliament if
12:41 pm
any deal they present is rejected to get parliament's opinion. and finally, it says that if we have no deal by the 15th of february next year, which, let's face it, will only be a few weeks before the end of the 29th of march, any expression of the 29th of march, any expression of opinion of parliament of what we should do next is binding on the government. the or leave it approach, which is what you object to, in effect, aren't you just creating more difficulties in prisons where you have had theresa may saying, the heaven's sake, you've got to back me now otherwise this all falls apart? but it's not failing to back her. she is going in to negotiate our future deal with the eu, this is about our process by which we try to ensure the maximum number of safeguards as we go through it. it doesn't affect her ability to negotiate a deal at allston white is it not saying you don't trust her to do it? no, it's making perfect the sensible and reasonable safeguards for what is
12:42 pm
undoubtedly a highly risky business. sarah wollaston, you are backing dominic grieve's amendment. why? well, it's so make sure that we can't at the end of this process crash out with absolutely no deal at all, and i think we need to talk about why that matters to people. we know that if we do crash up with no deal at all, that will have really serious consequences for people's jobs, even things like the supply chain of medicines that people rely on when they go to the pharmacy. it will have consequences for hours at your tee, will have consequences for hours at yourtee, airline will have consequences for hours at your tee, airline travel, all sort of things that people really care about —— our security. we want to make that looks like it might happening at the end of the deal, that parliament can come back and that parliament can come back and that government has to consult parliament about that before it just goes down that process. we've already had a government minister resigning this morning. is there are signs that this is now getting incredibly fragile, that the british public might turn round and say, please just get on with this! this is just
12:43 pm
please just get on with this! this isjust for a brewery please just get on with this! this is just for a brewery and fiddling. this is not about trying to tie the progress the's hands, it's about what we do at the end of this process if there is a very bad deal or no deal at all, because we think this would be disastrous.” or no deal at all, because we think this would be disastrous. i know you we re this would be disastrous. i know you were not at the meeting last night with theresa may, you had other business. dominic grieve, how do you think theresa may has played this in the last 24 hours? do you think she's managed to get enough support was ill and she's been very successful in the past week in bringing the party together. i'm very pleased that has happened. she has a very difficult time to play and, no, i think she's done a good job. but wejust and, no, i think she's done a good job. but we just need to get through these two days. and if people are just sensible, we will do so. not only that, people don't realise that we're not talking about these apocalyptic visions you see in the popular press this morning, we're talking about the nitty—gritty detail of trying to make sure that brexiter is carried out as well as possible so point you think you are
12:44 pm
being faithful to the prime minister, do you, with this? yes, entirely. absolutely, this is not about blocking brexit. anybody reading today's papers might think thatis reading today's papers might think that is the case, it's not. it's about present is about preventing us crashing out with no deal. what i'm hearing there will not be a vote on that amendment with dominic grieve because it does not have the backing of the government. the parliamentary procedure isjust too tight to allow them to call it. i'm looking at what is happening in the house of commons, john bercow, there is a discussion about what happens before this debate. they are discussing the newspaper headlines this morning, some unhappiness from chuka umunna about some of the headlines in the papers. let's dip into the house of commons and here before this full debate gets under way, because a lot of concern is being expressed about how it should being expressed about how it should be conducted. a courteous hearing to the honourable member of the scenting her ten minute rule motion.
12:45 pm
fiona bruce. thank you, mr speaker. i beg to move that leave be given to bring ina i beg to move that leave be given to bring in a bill to make provision about the minimum price that alcohol may be sold from licensed premises in england and connected purposes. i'd like to begin by thanking the government for the action it is already taking on alcohol harm. the actual debate won't get under way for about ten minutes. so, we will pull away from the house of commons. just to let you know, various full of interrupted coverage of this debate. but will be an bbc parliament. we are keeping an eye on that and when it gets under way we will take you to the house of commons for that. the vote will be called at about 4pm. vote will involve the meaningful vote froch, if you like. that is the one which may cause problems for theresa may, but we won't know the result until about 440 5p. it is one of a clutch that we will keep an eye on, and we
12:46 pm
will have full coverage from westminster for the afternoon. back to you, go juanma. westminster for the afternoon. back to you, gojuanma. thanks, simon. mothers who decide not to breast—feed shouldn't be made to feel guilty, according to new advice from the royal college of midwives. the guidelines say that if a woman decides to bottle—feed then her choice must be respected. but the official overall policy hasn't changed, as andy moore reports. the medical advice hasn't changed — breast is still best. the world health organization says babies should be exclusively breast—fed for the first six months of their lives. research shows those children are less likely to develop diabetes and the obese in later life. but the uk has one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe. at six weeks, less than half of mothers are exclusively breast—feeding. at six months, that drops to about 1%. the royal college of midwives is now acknowledging that some mothers struggle to start or carry on breast—feeding. the chief executive,
12:47 pm
gill walton, said... the organisation says mothers should be given advice on the safe preparation of bottles, and how they can develop a close and loving bond with their child, despite not breast—feeding. andy moore, bbc news. a decision by spain to take in a migrant rescue vessel stranded in the mediterranean has been hailed by the italian interior minister as a victory for his government's immigration policy. italy and malta had both refused to allow the rescue ship aquarius, which was carrying more than 600 migrants, to dock at any of their ports. it's now been decided that the migrants will be transferred to other vessels before being taken to spain. a woman found dead in a property in essex had been stabbed multiple times. 49—year old tina
12:48 pm
cantello was reported missing on friday after she failed to return home from work. the debt—collectors body was discovered at a home in basildon on saturday evening. police say she died from multiple stab wounds to the chest. a 38—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. we're told that driverless cars will be the future of motoring, but how will they actually work? manufacturers are being warned that words like "autonomous" and "autopilot" are lulling some drivers into a false sense of security. motorists may think that they have self—driving cars when that's not actually the case, as our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones, explains. so, the autopilot system is on... this is not a self—driving car, but the tesla has some features to automate the driving process, and car insurers are worried about how they're described. we've got something there called "autopilot". i think it's misleading — autopilot suggests, well, that's doing it itself. well, this car doesn't do it itself, this car is only supporting the driver, and therefore we should
12:49 pm
use the word "assisted". in april, a british tesla driver, who apparently believed his car was self—driving, lost his licence when he was filmed on the motorway sitting not behind the wheel, but in the passenger seat. 0n the thatcham research track, where they conduct safety tests for car insurers, we're trying out the autopilot system. we're following another car, which comes across a queue of traffic. and automatically in standing traffic we've come to a halt. so, the autopilot system worked pretty well there. the danger is, it lulls the driver into a false sense of security. now let's try another scenario. this time, the car we are following is going to change lanes at the very last moment. and, with the driver not concentrating, the autopilot doesn't brake in time. fortunately, this was just a dummy car. tesla told us... i've got my hands off the wheel,
12:50 pm
because i'm on a test track, but it's going to be telling me every 15 seconds, "put your hands on the wheel". this bmw also has some assisted driverfeatures, and he prefers the way they're labelled. but the car's lane—hugging technology does fail to cope with this very tight bend. bmw says it's quite clear its driving assistant feature doesn't replace the driver. overall, the insurers want more clarity for motorists. i think there's a problem with vehicle manufacturers trying to introduce technology, and the consumer not being ready for it, not being sure, is it automated, do i have to keep watching? we want it very clear — either you are driving, assistance,
12:51 pm
or you are not driving, automated. tesla, bmw and many others are racing to develop fully self—driving cars. but on the way to the autonomous future, there could be dangers ahead. rory cellan—jones, bbc news, upper heyford, in 0xfordshire. this friday, schools and community groups across the country are being encouraged to go green for grenfell, to help mark the first anniversary of the fire. the grenfell community also wants to see people fundraise for good causes in their area. graham satchell has been to meet some of those taking part. one year on, and memorials are weather—beaten, but the message on the tower itself is clear: loved ones will never be forgotten. nick burton was on the 19th floor when the fire started. he lost his wife, his home, everything. i still don't think it's my life. it's like i'm kind of outside
12:52 pm
and looking into this world where i'm just on this treadmill going 100 mph so many things have happened, you know? i lost my friends, my neighbours and my wife, my dog, my home... i still haven't come to terms or slowed down to think, you know, this is... this is me. the shock, the trauma here is still raw. in a community centre next to the tower, local residents are making flowers, badges, green hearts, for the anniversary. how can you make sense of this tragedy when you do not have the answers and you have no justice? it's almost as if the whole system collapsed on the 14th ofjune, and we're trying to understand why people lost their lives, why couldn't they be in suitable, safe accommodation? survivors of the fire want
12:53 pm
the country to go green for grenfell this week. hundreds of miles away in cornwall, that's exactly what the schoolchildren are doing. they are part of a scheme called cornwall hugs grenfell. cornwall hugs was set up to bring people down to cornwall for respite to make new memories. we've brought nearly 20% of the survivors here, and they say it has been healing to be with the cornish people. i felt really sad for them because there are lots of people who have lost people, especially children. it means helping them and giving them lots of, like, memories and just making sure that they know that we haven't forgotten them. there are painful memories this week, and with it, anger. that lessons haven't
12:54 pm
yet been learned. there are still tower blocks today with combustible cladding. g re nfell grenfell has to stand for something. the whole world is watching. this cannot happen again. it is a ticking time bomb where the possibility is still high, and i'm scared, i am truly scared, for those people, that how can they sleep at night, you know, children and adults and everybody and their families, they all know that, you know, within half an hour, their tower could go up just like grenfell did. one year on, the call is the same — for action, change, justice. graham satchell, bbc news. remembering the victims of grenfell with the one—year anniversary on thursday. the debate on the eu withdrawal bill is about to begin in the house of commons. there's full uninterrupted coverage of the eu withdrawal bill debate on bbc parliament. and of course we will have full coverage on the bbc news channel
12:55 pm
throughout the rest of the day. there will be key votes starting from around 4pm. theresa may has told senior ministers that the votes that will be happening over the coming two days on the bill are important in terms of the message they send to brussels. plenty of coverage throughout the rest of the day. in a moment, the news at one with jane hill. first, the weather with matt taylor. it isa it is a little bit cloudier and fresher across some parts, but another dry day for most. that includes western scotland, stornoway, today is the 22nd consecutive day without rain. that, however, will change in 24 hours. this area of cloud out in the atla ntic this area of cloud out in the atlantic is getting picked up by a vigorousjet atlantic is getting picked up by a vigorous jet stream. that will develop into a vigorous low—pressure system late on wednesday into thursday. the time being, thejet
12:56 pm
strea m thursday. the time being, thejet stream is absent. a ridge of high pressure, most in dry through the afternoon. when the sun is out, very pleasant. when the cloud is in place, mid high teens. cloud melts away tonight, clear skies across the country, meaning it will be a slightly fresher night than in recent nights. temperatures away from towns and cities dropping into single figures, but not desperately chilly to take us into wednesday morning. a lovely start of the morning, a bit of cloud here and there in central and eastern scotland. sunny spells, showers across southern counties of england and wales but most places avoiding them. cloud thickens up in western scotla nd them. cloud thickens up in western scotland and northern ireland bringing bricks of rein in the west. —— breaksa bringing bricks of rein in the west. —— breaks a frame. —— breaks of rain. an area of low pressure pushes income are making an impact in the northern half of the uk. we go from northern half of the uk. we go from no rain in 22 days to several inches
12:57 pm
in the space of 24 hours. thursday morning, a scattering of showers but of the winds are notable, 56 mph gusts may be likely in northern england, northern ireland and scotland. the greatest impact of the weather will be felt on thursday morning, there could be travel disruption. we will keep you up—to—date. the wind is not a strong further south, but more blustery than of late. winds coming from a westerly direction, bringing showers and outbreaks of rain in the morning. sunny spells in the afternoon. 0ne morning. sunny spells in the afternoon. one or two showers still around, but it will feel fresher in the westerly breeze, tempered by the return of afternoon sunshine. into the weekend, another spell of rain in northern areas on friday. varying amounts of cloud, some sunshine, but amounts of cloud, some sunshine, but a few showers too. president donald trump and north korea's kimjong—un make history, with a handshake. thank you very much. it's fantastic. the leaders later signed a document which included a pledge from mr kim
12:58 pm
to work to rid the korean peninsula of nuclear weapons. people are going to be very impressed. people are going to be very happy. and we're going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world. both leaders have now left. we'll have the latest analysis from singapore and washington. also this lunchtime. ajunior minister has quit the government on the day of a crucial vote on parliament's final role in any brexit deal. an alleged member of a banned neo—nazi group has admitted plotting to murder an mp and threatening to kill a police officer.
12:59 pm
1:00 pm

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on